Sensitive to claims of bias, Facebook relaxed misinformation rules for conservative pages

Sensitive to claims of bias, Facebook relaxed misinformation rules for conservative pages

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What’s Facebook’s Deal With Donald Trump?
Mark Zuckerberg has forged an uneasy alliance with the Trump administration. He may have gotten too close.

INSTAGRAM LAUNCHES REELS, ITS ATTEMPT TO KEEP YOU OFF TIKTOK

Trump hosted Zuckerberg for undisclosed dinner at the White House in October

Social Media Imposing Modern-Day Hays Code on Political Speech

Social Media Imposing Modern-Day Hays Code on Political Speech

Nearly a century later, lawmakers are once again awakening to the power of centralized speech controls by turning to social media companies to impose constraints traditionally prohibited under the First Amendment. Twenty state attorneys general demanded this week that Facebook considerably narrow its speech rules to outlaw anything the government sees as “hate speech.” While the government itself cannot ban most speech, this novel approach suggests it may be legal for the government to instead ask private companies to ban speech it dislikes, nominally complying with the First Amendment by outsourcing the banning process.

‘Godzilla’ was a metaphor for Hiroshima, and Hollywood whitewashed it

‘Godzilla’ was a metaphor for Hiroshima, and Hollywood whitewashed it

This month is the 75th anniversary of the U.S. bombings in Hiroshima on Aug. 6 and Nagasaki three days later, and while many Americans today think of the film as an almost campy relic of its time, it was intended in Japan to be a metaphor for the ills of atomic testing and the use of nuclear weapons, considering what Japan endured after the bombings. The movie served as a strong political statement, representative of the traumas and anxieties of the Japanese people in an era when censorship was extensive in Japan because of the American occupation of the country after the war ended, Tsutsui said. The screen depicted what many could not explicitly say.