Neoliberalism is the Bipartisan Consensus, Not the Lesser of Two Evils

Neoliberalism is the Bipartisan Consensus, Not the Lesser of Two Evils

West’s incorrect partisan conceptualization of neoliberalism is not only wrong, but it is misleading. While the word “neoliberal” is etymologically related to the word “liberal,” it has no relationship with the current political usage of the term “liberal” and its modern association with the Democratic Party. Rather, it harkens back to the 18th century Scottish economic philosopher Adam Smith who advocated the removal of all tariffs and restrictions on free capital so that the “invisible hand” of the market could bring prosperity to all. In the post-WWII years of the 20th century, Smith’s ideas about the liberalization of capital were brought back into the spotlight by economist Friedrich Hayek and, later, Milton Friedman whose goal was to completely dismantle the social safety nets of FDR’s New Deal, which, it was argued, hampered free capital. Thus, neoliberalism is a “neo” form of 18th century economic liberalism and has no connection to the political “liberalism” of today’s Democratic Party.

Barr says ‘no reason’ to seize voting machines as he pushes back on Trump conspiracy theories

Barr says ‘no reason’ to seize voting machines as he pushes back on Trump conspiracy theories

“Let me just say that there are fraud in, unfortunately in most elections, I think we’re too tolerant of it and I’m sure there was fraud in this election,” Mr Barr said.

“But I was commenting on the extent to which we had looked at suggestions or allegations of systemic or broad-based fraud that would affect the outcome of the election and I already spoke to that and I stand by that statement.”

Tax break for corporate meal expenses inserted into coronavirus aid package

Tax break for corporate meal expenses inserted into coronavirus aid package

Since the 1980s, businesses have only been able to deduct 50 percent of their meal expenses off their federal taxes. A proposal championed by the White House and Sen. Tim Scott (R-S.C.) would increase that deduction to 100 percent allowing companies to deduct the full cost of a business meal off their federal taxes.