At 36, World’s Youngest Leader Boric Electrifies UN Assembly

At 36, World’s Youngest Leader Boric Electrifies UN Assembly

The Chilean president called on leaders to avoid turning a blind eye to human rights violations around the world, from Iran to Venezuela and Nicaragua. He also made a staunch defense of Ukraine, criticizing Russia’s “unjust” invasion of that country.

Related:

Chile’s Boric Is Becoming More Right Wing by the Day

Chilean president Gabriel Boric was hailed as a leftist leader. In fact, his administration has joined the U.S. in condemning Latin America’s revolutionary leaders, and voters rejected his proposed constitutional changes, with 62% opposed. Boric is a reformer who acts in league with right wing forces.

WATCH: Chilean President Boric Urges Solidarity for Palestine during UN Speech

US Secretary of State to visit Chile in early October and meet with president Boric

It’s interesting, to me, that he brings up human rights violations in nations that are the US’ boogeymen. I’ll give him credit for standing up for Palestinians, at least.

USAID’s New Stage of Pressure and Interference against Venezuela + PSUV Approval Rating Almost Triples That of All Opposition Parties Combined in Venezuela

USAID’s New Stage of Pressure and Interference against Venezuela

Related:

Latest Poll: PSUV Approval Rating Almost Triples That of All Opposition Parties Combined in Venezuela

Venezuelan Foreign Minister: Washington Intends to Silence Venezuela’s Fight Against Drug Trafficking (+Statement)

Biden adds billions in Ukraine ‘aid,’ pushing total to $70 billion

The people of Jackson, Mississippi, have toxic sludge coming out of their kitchen faucets. In some neighborhoods, there isn’t enough water pressure to flush toilets. They’ve gotten, at most, the distracted attention of President Joe Biden.

One joker suggested that if the city of Jackson declared itself a part of Ukraine, the $2 billion check would be in the mail tomorrow.

Biden adds billions in Ukraine ‘aid,’ pushing total to $70 billion

Americans Can Now Expect to Live Three Years Less than Cubans

Americans Can Now Expect to Live Three Years Less than Cubans

Source: Ian Bremmer

The decline means that several countries have caught up with or surpassed the U.S. According to World Bank data, Cuba’s life expectancy is 78.9, and China’s is 77.1, although both figures are from 2020 rather than 2021.

Other countries that are ahead of the U.S. in terms of life expectancy include: Colombia, Uruguay and Chile; Costa Rica, Panama and Puerto Rico; and Turkey, Greece and Albania.

Cubans have access to free healthcare, which is one of the key socialist principles. The country has a high ratio of medical professionals and focuses on prevention and primary care.

Related:

List of countries with universal health care

Man who attempted to assassinate Argentine vice president has Nazi tattoo

Identified as Fernando Andre Sabag Montiel, suspect sports a ‘black sun’ symbol that has been used by white supremacist mass shooters

Man who attempted to assassinate Argentine vice president has Nazi tattoo

U.S. “Waited and Watched” as Cuba Fought Deadly Blaze

Aug 15, 2022 – When a catastrophic fire in Matanzas threatened Cuba’s fuel supply, other countries rushed to help. What did the world’s most powerful country offer Cuba? A phone call. The lack of U.S. support has sparked outrage. And its crushing sanctions have limited Cuba’s ability to respond.

Video via Belly of The Beast Cuba

Related:

While Cuba Deals with Blazing Fire, the U.S. Heartlessly Watches and Waits

House Dems Urge Biden to Provide Assistance to Cuba Amid Fire Disaster

At Least 1 Dead and 121 Injured in Fuel Storage Depot Fire in Matanzas, Cuba

The Cuban president stated in a tweet, “We express deep gratitude to the governments of Mexico, Venezuela, Russia, Nicaragua, Argentina and Chile, which have promptly offered solidarity and material aid in the face of this complex situation. Cuba also appreciates the offer of technical advice from the United States.”

Chile’s Draft Constitution: Undemocratic—or Too Much Democracy?

Chileans will vote in September on whether to approve a new constitution that promises to address inequality and lack of democracy (Reuters, 7/4/22). It would replace the present constitution imposed by the dictatorship of Gen. Augusto Pinochet, who came into power through a US-backed coup in 1973. The nation’s newly elected left-wing leadership is calling for a “yes” vote, although in the much-divided country, the constitution faces steep opposition from the right.

Chile’s Draft Constitution: Undemocratic—or Too Much Democracy?