Who are the 11 senators who voted against the burn pits bill for veterans?

Who are the 11 senators who voted against the burn pits bill for veterans?

Senators Mitt Romney, Thom Tillis, Rand Paul, Tommy Tuberville, Richard Shelby, Pat Toomey, Mike Crapo, James Lankford, Mike Lee, Cynthia Lummis, and James Risch ultimately voted against the bill.

Political commentators were less surprised to see Mr Paul oppose the bill, as the libertarian frequently opposes federal spending — unless it directly benefits him.

Mr Paul said the bill would put the economy “at risk” and attempted to include an amendment to the legislation that would cut spending on foreign aid in order to offset the cost. That amendment was ultimately voted down.

Mr Paul had no problem asking for federal aid when his home state of Kentucky saw severe damage caused by tornadoes in 2021. He has regularly opposed federal aid bills for other disasters, and has previously attempted to attach amendments that reduce foreign aid spending to offset the costs of disaster relief.

Mr Tillis, Mr Lee, and Mr Lankford said they opposed the bill over fears that it would allow more people to get treatment at the VA and increase wait times for veterans seeking healthcare. While wait times are never ideal, waiting weeks or even months for treatment is still a shorter wait than simply never being eligible for healthcare.

Cut all foreign aid!

‘Slippery Slope… Just Got a Lot Steeper’: US to Send Ukraine Advanced Missiles as Russia Holds Nuke Drills

Peace advocates fear the Biden administration’s high-tech arms shipments to Ukraine are increasing the likelihood of a full-scale conflict between the U.S. and Russia.

‘Slippery Slope… Just Got a Lot Steeper’: US to Send Ukraine Advanced Missiles as Russia Holds Nuke Drills

Previously:

Ukraine Says It Might Use US Weapons to Invade Russia

Brandon is going to get us all killed! 😳

U.S. Spends Billions on War in Ukraine and the Working Class Pays the Price, by Natalia Marques

The largest national defense budget in the world just got larger. Earlier this month, the United States Congress passed $728.5 billion in discretionary funding for the Department of Defense for the 2022 fiscal year, a sharp 5% increase from the previous year. The budget contains a plan for $13.6 billion in aid to Ukraine for the Russia–Ukraine war.

U.S. Spends Billions on War in Ukraine and the Working Class Pays the Price, by Natalia Marques

War on the Horizon with China (The Neoconservative Dream)

Have neoconservative policies regarding China stopped with just “regime change”? Bill Kristol, Weekly Standard, believes that it must happen for the best interests of American foreign policy. In the latest news, US military forces have been reported to have been in Taiwan for at least 12 months to strengthen its defenses against intensifying Chinese aggression. Taiwan is considered “self resilient” against China, however, China has shown no aggression towards the country. Yet we continue to gradually move toward a conflict with a country which has been seen as a threat to our world economy and hegemony with indo-china. The Pentagon meanwhile has criticized its own slow in progression of it’s defense strategy. General John E. Hyten, Joint Chiefs of Staff, referenced the unprecedented speed at which Beijing is developing its military capabilities, particularly the modernization of its nuclear arsenal, as one of the Pentagon’s top concerns. But at what cost will this be at the average American citizen?

YouTube: War on the Horizon with China (The Neoconservative Dream)

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Lawmakers pave way for $1.2 trillion in new military spending over next 10 years

By Andrew Lautz | Responsible Statecraft | September 2, 2021

Reporters, lobbyists, activists, Biden administration officials and, of course, lawmakers and their staffs spent countless hours and an ocean of ink on the negotiations for and passage of a recent bipartisan infrastructure bill totaling around $1 trillion. Casual observers probably won’t hear as much, though, about two votes — one in the Senate and one in the House — that could pave the way for Congress to spend a whopping $1.2 trillion additional dollars on the military, above current projections, over the next decades. Here’s how.

Lawmakers pave way for $1.2 trillion in new military spending over next 10 years