Montana’s 150 missile sites in line for replacement as Chinese spy balloon questions remain

Montana’s 150 missile sites in line for replacement as Chinese spy balloon questions remain

Bartel is a state senator representing a district in Fergus County, an area with some of Malmstrom’s missile sites.

The Department of Defense has referenced these critical zones in its media briefings on the balloon in recent days. Meanwhile, the Department of Defense has been making plans for a massive overhaul of the nuclear missiles scattered across the state.

The upgrades are something Bartel is familiar with because 50 of those missile locations are in Fergus County.

He says the upgrades were set to start in 2025. Now that’s been pushed back, and talks about upgrades with the Air Force suddenly became radio silent.

“We’ve been told that the project has been pushed out. It’s been pushed out two years,” he said. “They are having some redesign issues with the missiles themselves.”

Advertisement

Eric Zuesse: Why 100% Of The Blame For Ukraine’s War Is Obama’s, And None Is Putin’s

Written by Eric Zuesse on 03/02/2023

This is in response to Caitlin Johnstone’s January 28th article, which alleged that not all of the blame for the war in Ukraine goes to Obama’s decisions, and which accused Russia of “warmongering” (and avoided using any such strong term of condemnation against America’s Government), “Why Don’t You Ever Criticize RUSSIA’S Warmongering??”:

Why 100% Of The Blame For Ukraine’s War Is Obama’s, And None Is Putin’s

H/T: THE NEW DARK AGE

CSIS advises US to prepare for possible redeployment of tactical nukes to S. Korea

A Washington think tank is advising the US government to review military exercises in preparation for the redeployment of tactical nuclear weapons in South Korea. The think tank also advised the US to consider partial sanctions relief for North Korea on the condition that it ceases its nuclear weapons and missile tests.

CSIS advises US to prepare for possible redeployment of tactical nukes to S. Korea

H/T: WENT2THEBRIDGE.ORG

Biden calls global warming bigger threat to humanity than nuclear war during NYC speech

Twitter.

President Biden gave Manhattan donors an update on his thoughts about nuclear war Tuesday, saying that he currently views global warming as a greater threat — less than four months after he casually told a different set of New York City donors that the world was close to nuclear “Armageddon.”

Biden calls global warming bigger threat to humanity than nuclear war during NYC speech

Don’t Be So Quick To Listen To America’s Retired Generals On Ukraine

Don’t Be So Quick to Listen To America’s Retired Generals on Ukraine: Americans have always loved military leaders, especially generals; the 1970 movie Patton, about the life of the United States’ greatest World War II commander, is still popular in America. When the current crop of active and retired generals speak today, it is unsurprising that most in our country reflexively accept what they say at face value. Especially as their assessments and advice relate to American vital national interests in the Russia-Ukraine War, however, such trust should be reassessed.

Don’t Be So Quick To Listen To America’s Retired Generals On Ukraine

He doesn’t think that we’re in a proxy war with Russia?!

Related:

At War With the Truth

An interview with General Valery Zaluzhny

I Don’t Want to #StopAsianHate. I Want to End US Imperialism

By Elizabeth Tang – July 8, 2021

Editorial note: As a rule Orinoco Tribune does not re-publish opinion pieces more than 10 days after their original publication, but in this case we are making an exception, because this is a on a very sensitive issue that demands attention.

I don’t like the #StopAsianHate hashtag. First of all, Asians are not the ones doing the “hating.” And second, why are we calling it “hate” at all? Anti-Asian violence is systemic—it cannot be reduced to individual feelings.

I Don’t Want to #StopAsianHate. I Want to End US Imperialism

Opinion: Blinken ponders the post-Ukraine-war order

Opinion: Blinken ponders the post-Ukraine-war order

Crimea is a particular point of discussion. There is a widespread view in Washington and Kyiv that regaining Crimea by military force may be impossible. Any Ukrainian military advances this year in Zaporizhzhia oblast, the land bridge that connects Crimea and Russia, could threaten Russian control. But an all-out Ukrainian campaign to seize the Crimean Peninsula is unrealistic, many U.S. and Ukrainian officials believe. That’s partly because Putin has indicated that an assault on Crimea would be a tripwire for nuclear escalation.

The administration shares Ukraine’s insistence that Crimea, which was seized by Russia in 2014, must eventually be returned. But in the short run, what’s crucial for Kyiv is that Crimea no longer serve as a base for attacks against Ukraine. One formula that interests me would be a demilitarized status, with questions of final political control deferred. Ukrainian officials told me last year that they had discussed such possibilities with the administration.

As Blinken weighs options in Ukraine, he has been less worried about escalation risks than some observers. That’s partly because he believes Russia is checked by NATO’s overwhelming power. “Putin continues to hold some things in reserve because of his misplaced fear that NATO might attack Russia,” explained the official familiar with Blinken’s thinking. This Russian reserve force includes strategic bombers, certain precision-guided weapons and, of course, tactical and strategic nuclear weapons.

Are they really this delusional?!